Cornell University
NextGen Cassava

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Elizabeth Agbamuche, a B.Sc. student, carries out controlled pollination on a cassava flower.

Elizabeth Agbamuche, a B.Sc. student, carries out controlled pollination on a cassava flower. Photo courtesy of Dr. Ismail Rabbi, IITA

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NEXTGEN Cassava will work to mainstream gendered traits into partner breeding programs, ushering in a new era in gender conscious plant breeding.

NEXTGEN Cassava will work to mainstream gendered traits into partner breeding programs, ushering in a new era in gender conscious plant breeding. Photo courtesy of Dr. Ismail Rabbi, IITA.

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Dr. Ismail Rabbi, IITA, examines physiological traits of a cassava plant.

Dr. Ismail Rabbi, IITA, examines physiological traits of a cassava plant. Photo courtesy of Dr. Ismail Rabbi, IITA.

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Cassava has received relatively little research and development attention compared to other staples such as wheat, rice and maize, despite it's importance for food security for Africa.

Cassava has received relatively little research and development attention compared to other staples such as wheat, rice and maize, despite it's importance for food security for Africa. Photo courtesy of Dr. Ismail Rabbi, IITA.

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Improving of cassava flowering and seed set would allow breeders to fully utilize available genetic resources in their cassava breeding programs.

Improving of cassava flowering and seed set would allow breeders to fully utilize available genetic resources in their cassava breeding programs. Photo courtesy of Dr. Ismail Rabbi, IITA.

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Cassava produces large edible starchy roots that can be cooked, boiled, baked or fried at the household level, or highly processed into starch as a food additive.

Cassava produces large edible starchy roots that can be cooked, boiled, baked or fried at the household level, or highly processed into starch as a food additive. Photo courtesy of Hale Tufan, Cornell University.

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Cassava being sold by women in a market in Kampala, Uganda

In Africa, cassava is typically considered a "woman's crop" - primarily grown, processed and sold by women. Here, it is being sold at the Kalerwe market in Kampala, Uganda. Photo courtesy of Hale Tufan, Cornell University.

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NEXTGEN Cassava aims to secure the future of cassava production by investing in the next generation of cassava breeders.

NEXTGEN Cassava aims to secure the future of cassava production by investing in the next generation of cassava breeders. Photo provided by Dr. Chiedozie Egesi, NRCRI.

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Cassava roots are processed and eaten by 500 million people a day in Africa, where it is a staple for 40% of the population.

Dr. Chiedozie Egesi and Edith Abalogu collect disease and flowering data from cassava plants. Photo provided by Dr. Chiedozie Egesi, NRCRI.

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Dr. Yona Baguma discusses with students enrolled in the Plant Breeding and Seed Systems program at Makerere University, an award winning course that will train 8 MSc students as a part of  NEXTGEN Cassava capacity building activities.

Dr. Yona Baguma discusses with students enrolled in the Plant Breeding and Seed Systems program at Makerere University, an award winning course that will train 8 MSc students as a part of NEXTGEN Cassava capacity building activities. Photo provided by Hale Tufan, Cornell University.

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Cassava roots are processed and eaten by 500 million people a day in Africa, where it is a staple for 40% of the population.

Cassava roots are processed and eaten by 500 million people a day in Africa, where it is a staple for 40% of the population. Photo courtesy of Hale Tufan, Cornell University.

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